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The Malt Board: August / September 2015

Scholarship Recipients Attend Field Barley School at NDSU

By Andy Golden.The North Dakota State University (NDSU) Barley Field School was a great experience to educate maltsers of all levels.  The two and a half day course consisted of briefings from NDSU faculty, members from the North Dakota Barley Counsel, different growers from throughout the region, and operators from the local grain elevator facility. READ MORE

Flavor First: Innovations in Barley Malting for Today’s Brewer – Request for Samples

By Andrea Stanley. Are you looking to get involved in our industry’s discussion about malt and flavor? We are looking for samples of Craft Malt for a MBAA workshop titled: Flavor First – Innovations in Barley and Malting for Today’s Brewer. The workshop will take place during the MBAA Annual Conference (October 8-10 in Jacksonville, FL) which you may be interested in attending. READ MORE

Brewers Association Awards Guild $5,000 to Support Quality Manual & More

By Chuck Skypeck. Over the past few decades, craft brewing has profoundly changed both the brewing industry and the allied trade that supports the brewing industry. Slowly at first, but much more rapidly in the last few years, consumer preference for increased variety and innovative beer styles have created dramatic changes worldwide in both brewing and the cultivation of hops. READ MORE

Recent Craft Malt Event Highlights

We return to Deer Creek Malt in Pennsylvania for the Hops, Wines and Vines Festival.  Have you participated in an event you would like to share in a future newsletter? Please let Deb Kleinman know all about it! READ MORE

Members Corner

Read up on announcements and updates for Guild Members.  READ MORE

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Scholarship Recipients Attend Field Barley School at NDSU

Photo: Andy Golden

Photo: Andy Golden

By Andy Golden, 2015 NDSU Field Barley School Scholarship Recipient. The North Dakota State University (NDSU) Barley Field School was a great experience to educate maltsers of all levels.  The two and a half day course consisted of briefings from NDSU faculty, members from the North Dakota Barley Counsel, different growers from throughout the region, and operators from the local grain elevator facility.  These professionals were well prepared to educate the students who came from extremely diverse background and experience levels; not a single question went unanswered.

Photo: Camille Boldt

Photo: Camille Boldt

Some of the briefing topics that were helpful dealt with soil analysis & preparation, how growing practices affect malt quality, pests & diseases,harvesting, and storage.  One could have attended this field school with little to no experience at growing malting barley and walk away with a solid base of knowledge on how to produce the crop.  These briefings were conducted at various locations.  Some were in an academic environment in classrooms at NDSU.  Others were done on site at greenhouses, grain handling facilities, and at the NDSU’s field trials.  On the last day, students were even brought to a large, local malting barley farm to discuss operations with the family farm team.

Self Portrait: Camille Boldt

Self Portrait: Camille Boldt

The students provided a myriad of diverse barley backgrounds. Useful conversations were constantly being held with the open environment created by the NDSU staff.  Experience in the classroom included:  a director of brewing from a large brewery, a member from one of the nation’s largest malting facilities, agronomic scientists from Brazil, a maltster from Norway, professors from three different large universities, and barley growers and processors.  Being able to network with these professionals was one of the most useful aspects of the field school and will be a benefit for years to come.

The North Dakota Barely Field School was professionally run from start to finish.  It was a professional, academic environment that educated and connected persons in the malting barley industry from growers to maltsters to brewers.  I recommend this field school to anyone that would like to learn more about the malting barley industry.

Robin Coffman, 2015 NDSU Field Barley School Scholarship Recipient. 

Photo: Camille Boldt

Photo: Camille Boldt

What was the biggest highlight for you? To be honest, I really enjoyed the opportunities that we had to experience the local brews!  I have a growing appreciation for the complexity and artisanship of craft malting, and am excited to connect the entire chain from barley breeder to craft brewer!  I enjoyed the overview of this industry from various angles, and I look forward to learning more as my aspirations evolve.

What are you taking away from the NDSU experience that will help you with your craft malt goals and aspirations? I am involved with the barley breeding program at The Ohio State University/OARDC.  Participating in the Barley Field School gave me the opportunity to be surrounded by people of many varied interests, including craft maltsters, those who are wanting to become craft maltsters, farmers interested in growing malting barley, and others who are also involved at the academic level.  There is a lot of excitement for this craft, at every level!  The presentations that were given, as well as the site visits that we made, were all really beneficial toward expanding my personal understanding and overview of this specialty crop.

What are you going to do to help build craft malt supply chain in your region? We are in the early stages of in-state malting for Ohio, which makes it a very exciting time for us as barley breeders!  There is such a growing interest in having not only in-state malting, but also in-state supply/cropping for the craft brewing industry.  Having an opportunity to listen to the conversations and presentations by professors and other group participants gave me a much more broad understanding of the challenges and considerations that must be met as we move forward.  As an aspiring barley breeder (still learning), I look forward to having more involvement in the needs of those who are further along the supply chain, including maltsters and farmers willing to grow this specialty crop.  One of our goals for the future will be to make a website available that links the two groups, so that they can find each other easily!  

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Flavor First: Innovations in Barley & Malting for Today’s Brewer – Request for Samples

By Andrea Stanley. Are you looking to get involved in our industry’s discussion about malt and flavor? We are looking for samples of Craft Malt for a MBAA workshop titled: Flavor First – Innovations in Barley and Malting for Today’s Brewer. The workshop will take place during the MBAA Annual Conference (link), which you may be interested in attending.

The workshop will be facilitated by Tim Matthews from award-winning brewery, Oskar Blues who will lead panelists in a deep dive into today’s science, production agronomics, small-scale malting technologies and the collaboration with brewers that is driving innovation in malting for tomorrow’s great beer.

As a sensory component to the workshop we will have a Tasting Table with a variety of malts (could be barley and/or other grains) from various maltsters (commercial and craft) and various regions. This is where your submitted malts would be tasted.

Instructions for Submitting Samples: 

1) We need 5 pounds per sample

2) It should be sent to Andrea Stanley, Board Chair, Craft Maltsters Guild, C/O Valley Malt 27 Middle St Hadley, MA 01035.

3) Send at least one base malt and if you want, one non-base (e.g. Munich)

4) Include the ASBC analysis for the malt on your letterhead and a verbal description if you so choose.

If you have further questions please contact andrea@craftmalting.com by September 1st
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Brewers Association Awards Guild $5,000 to Support Quality Manual & More

By Chuck Skypeck, Brewers Association & Board of Directors, Craft Maltsters Guild. Over the past few decades, craft brewing has profoundly changed both the brewing industry and the allied trade that supports the brewing industry. Slowly at first, but much more rapidly in the last few years, consumer preference for increased variety and innovative beer styles have created dramatic changes worldwide in both brewing and the cultivation of hops.

Barley cultivation and malting, for a variety of reasons, have been slower to adapt to these consumer trends. With a few exceptions, a monolithic system for both barley and malt production has remained in place. From the characteristics of the varieties grown to the scale of production facilities, it is clear that change needs to occur as barley transitions from a commodity crop to a specialty grain whose primary use is to produce malt for brewing.

Brewers Association supports the diversification of the supply channels needed to ensure our brewery members have a variety of sources of high quality raw materials to brew beer. The challenges associated with the early days of craft brewing are still fresh in the minds of many brewers. Brewers Association is proud to be able to provide a $5,000 grant to the Craft Maltsters Guild to help develop and produce a Quality Manual for craft malt production and product quality procedures and equipment recommendations.
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Guild Member Event Highlights

Photo: Deer Creek Malt

Photo: Deer Creek Malt

Hops, Wines and Vines Festival, Central PA. Mark Brault, Deer Creek Malthouse. Deer Creek Malthouse participated for the first time in the Selinsgrove Hops, Wines, and Vines Festival in July.  The 8th annual event brought 42 breweries and about 2000 people to the small town in central Pennsylvania. Deer Creek promoted craft malt with Selin’s Grove Brewery pouring a “PA Porter” made with Deer Creek products. Several other breweries were in attendance that use Deer Creek malt including Victory, Troegs, Free Will, Ottos, Sly Fox, and The Brewery at Hershey. A great time was had by all!

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 Members Corner

There is a lot going on with the Guild these days! Here are some member updates and announcements.

  • Find Our Malt MapIt’s time to update the Find Our Malt Map. Have you started selling recently, or added new customers? Help us document the spread of craft malt around the country. Update the master spreadsheet today. There are separate tabs for breweries, distilleries, home brew suppliers, and even one bakery.
  • Member Resources: A reminder that a number of resources have been and are being created for members of the Guild. This includes a growing video library (including the videos from the Annual Meeting which will be uploaded this week), the malt grain contract template, and the under-utilized member directory to name a few. To get to member resources, go to our website, log on, and look in the Members Only tab. To update your membership information, log on and click on My Account.
  • EventsWhile you’re on our website, browse through upcoming events, workshops and courses. If you’re part of an event that isn’t listed, please send an email to Deb Kleinman.
  • Join the GuildIf you are a current or aspiring, Craft Maltster, a brewery or distillery that wants to secure local malt for your production, a farmer, or a fan of craft food and drink, join the Guild today.

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